DOWNLOAD OUR APP
IndiaOnline playstore
07:21 PM | Wed, 28 Sep 2016

Download Our Mobile App

Download Font

India's defence lab develops thermal imaging radar to look through walls

191 Days ago

New Delhi, March 21 (IANS) In what can prove to be a great aid for the Indian forces in dealing with hostage situations, India's premier government R&D body DRDO has developed a radar that can look through a wall.

The Through Barrier Imaging Radar, named 'Divyachakshu' (divine eye), has been developed by Defence Research and Development Organisation's (DRDO) Electronics & Radar Development Establishment (LRDE) based in Bangalore and is going through development trials now.

It can look though walls of 20-30 cm thickness made of any material, by using thermal imaging.

"The radar can produce images from the other side of the barrier up to a distance of 20 metres. It catches the thermal signatures and movements in a room can be clearly seen," a scientist working on the project told IANS on condition of anonymity.

The radar tracks heat on the other side of the wall and gives real time thermal image, which can disclose the movement, number of people and other important information about the situation on the other side of the barrier.

"In a hostage situation, the radar can help give an idea about the number of people inside the room and their movement," the scientists said.

According to experts, the nature of movements can help in locating the terrorists and differentiating them from the hostage.

The development of the radar was triggered by the Mumbai terror attack of November 2008, where terrorists took hostages at several locations, including hotel Taj Mahal, Oberoi Trident and Nariman House.

The device will also prove useful in situations such as the recent attacks in Gurdaspur, Punjab, where terrorists entered the Dina Nagar police station, or the Pathankot airbase and two of the terrorists went on to hide in a building.

The project was started in 2010 and the development trials are expected to conclude by the year end.

"We are looking at the Army, the BSF and paramilitary forces as the buyers," the scientist said.

The Indian Army at present does not have such an equipment.

Apart from the distinction of being indigenously developed, the equipment cost is low. The scientist said the device costs around Rs. 35 Lakh, while similar devices in the international market cost around Rs. 2 crore.

Efforts are also on to bring down the weight of the device from present 6-7 kg.

(Anjali Ojha can be contacted at anjali.o@ians. (IANS)

Viewed 67 times
  • SHARE THIS
  • TWEET THIS
  • SHARE THIS
  • E-mail
You might also want to read

Our Media Partners

app banner

REVOLUTIONARY ONE-STOP ALL-IN-1 MARKETING & BUSINESS SOLUTIONS

  • Digital Marketing
  • Website Designing
  • SMS Marketing
  • Catalogue Designing & Distribution
  • Branding
  • Offers Promotions
  • Manpower Hiring
  • Dealers
    Retail Shops
    Online Sellers

  • Distributors
    Wholesalers
    Manufacturers

  • Hotels
    Restaurants
    Entertainment

  • Doctors
    Chemists
    Hospitals

  • Agencies
    Brokers
    Consultants

  • Coaching Centres
    Hobby Classes
    Institutes

  • All types of
    Small & Medium
    Businesses

  • All types of
    Service
    Providers

FIND OUT MORE